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Remedial Massage vs Structural Integration, how are they different?



Should you book a Structural Integration or a Remedial session? And what are the differences?


Remedial Massage and Structural Integration are two popular techniques used for addressing pain, tension, and restricted movement in the body. Both techniques aim to improve physical function, reduce pain and discomfort, and enhance overall health and wellbeing. However, there are some key differences between Remedial Massage and Structural Integration that are worth considering when choosing a treatment approach.


Remedial Massage is a therapeutic massage technique that focuses on treating specific areas of the body that are experiencing pain or tension. Remedial Massage therapists use a range of techniques, including deep tissue massage, trigger point therapy, and myofascial release, to target specific areas of the body and relieve pain and discomfort. Remedial Massage is typically performed on a massage table and is designed to be a more superficial, focused treatment approach.


Structural Integration, on the other hand, is a more comprehensive treatment approach that aims to improve the overall alignment and balance of the body. Structural Integration practitioners use techniques such as myofascial release and movement re-education to address the underlying patterns of tension and restrictions in the body. The focus of Structural Integration is on improving the body's overall posture and alignment, which can lead to reduced pain and improved physical function. Structural Integration typically involves a series of 12 sessions, with each session building upon the previous one to create lasting changes in the body.


In conclusion, both Remedial Massage and Structural Integration are effective techniques for addressing pain, tension, and restricted movement in the body. The choice between the two will depend on the individual's specific needs and goals. If you are looking for a more focused, targeted treatment approach, Remedial Massage may be the best option for you. If, on the other hand, you are looking for a more comprehensive and longer lasting treatment approach that addresses the underlying patterns of tension in the body, Structural Integration may be a better fit. Regardless of the technique you choose, working with a skilled and experienced practitioner is the key to achieving the best possible results.




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